2016 Sustainable Foods Institute Agenda - Monterey Bay Aquarium

2016 Sustainable Foods Institute Agenda - Monterey Bay Aquarium

Program at-a-Glance Sunday, September 11: Monterey Plaza Hotel & Spa 6:30-8:30 p.m. Private reception for participating panelists, moderators, spe...

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Program at-a-Glance Sunday, September 11: Monterey Plaza Hotel & Spa

6:30-8:30 p.m.

Private reception for participating panelists, moderators, speakers and media

Monday, September 12: Monterey Plaza Hotel & Spa

7:00–8:00 a.m.

Registration & continental breakfast



8:00—8:30 a.m.

Welcome by Julie Packard, Executive Director, Monterey Bay Aquarium



8:30—9:00 a.m.

Keynote 1—Dr. M. Sanjayan: Envisioning the New Wild



9:00—9:45 a.m.

Seafood from Slaves: A conversation with Robin McDowell and Dr. Lisa Rende Taylor



9:45—10:45 a.m.

Panel 1—Seafood Traceability



10:45—11:15 a.m.

Break



11:15—12:30 p.m.

Panel 2—Plant Forward



12:30—1:45 p.m.

Lunch



1:45—2:45 p.m.

The Global Food Initiative: A conversation with Janet Napolitano

2:45—3:30 p.m.

Eating Indigenous: A conversation with Chef Alex Atala and “Sioux Chef” Sean Sherman

3:30—4:00 p.m.

Break



4:00—4:45 p.m.

Racing Extinction & the Vegan Diet: A conversation with Louie Psihoyos



4:45—6:30 p.m.

Free time for one-on-one interviews



6:30—9:00 p.m.

Reception at Monterey Bay Aquarium

Tuesday, September 13: Monterey Plaza Hotel & Spa

7:30—8:30 a.m.

Breakfast



8:30—9:00 a.m.

Keynote 2—Dr. Steve Gaines: The CO2 Footprint of Protein Sources



9:00—10:00 a.m.

Panel 3—Feeding the World with Aquaculture: Luxury vs. Subsistence

10:00—10:30 a.m.

Break



10:30—11:15 a.m.

What if California’s Drought Continues? A conversation with Dr. Ellen Hanak



11:15—12:15 p.m.

Panel 4—Marine Plastics: What’s the Catch?



12:15—1:30 p.m.

Lunch



1:30—2:00 p.m.

Keynote 3—Dr. Christine Blackburn: Understanding Global Climate Change



2:00—3:15 p.m.

Panel 5—Climate Change: Impacts on Food Security



3:15—3:45 p.m.

Break



3:45—4:30 p.m.

Trends in Food—A conversation with June Jo Lee



4:30—5:30 p.m.

Closing reception with refreshments

Institute Day 1 – Full Agenda Monday, September 12: Monterey Plaza Hotel & Spa Registration & deluxe continental breakfast



7:00–8:00 a.m.



8:00—8:30 a.m. Welcome by Julie Packard, Executive Director, Monterey Bay Aquarium



8:30—9:00 a.m. Keynote 1—Dr. M. Sanjayan: Envisioning the New Wild In the PBS series, EARTH: A New Wild, Dr. M. Sanjayan explores how humans are inextricably woven into every aspect of the planet’s natural systems. What can be learned from this fresh perspective and how might it help inform our relationships with nature and its natural resources toward a more sustainable future? Dr. M. Sanjayan is a global conservation scientist, writer and Emmy-nominated news contributor specializing in the role of conservation in improving human well-being. He serves on Conservation International ’s senior leadership team as executive vice president and senior scientist.



9:00—9:45 a.m. Seafood from Slaves: A conversation with Robin McDowell and Dr. Lisa Rende Taylor Over the course of 18 months, four journalists with The Associated Press tracked ships, located slaves and stalked refrigerated trucks to expose the abusive practices of the fishing industry in Southeast Asia. What has happened as a result of their award-winning reporting, and what do consumers need to know about their favorite seafood choices? Moderated by Barry Estabrook, Politics of the Plate Robin McDowell was part of an AP team that earned multiple awards for a series of stories that showed how seafood sold in U.S. grocery stores and restaurants had been produced as a result of slave labor. Currently based in Minnesota, Robin spent nearly two decades reporting for the AP in Southeast Asia. Dr. Lisa Rende Taylor is the founder and executive director of The Issara Institute, a public-private sector alliance that works directly with communities, local businesses and global brands to tackle human trafficking and forced labor in Southeast Asia.



9:45—10:45 a.m.

Panel 1—Seafood Traceability



How can you be certain of the provenance of the food you buy in a global marketplace when a



supplier may be thousands of miles distant and their product shipped through a complex supply



chain? Traceability services provide the technological means to track from source to end



destination and help highlight and reward the most ethical actors in the supply chain. Just how



does it work? Moderated by Beth Weise, USA Today Tejas Bhatt is Director of the Global Food Traceability Center at the Institute of Food Technologists. He directs its science and policy initiatives related to food traceability.

Institute Day 1, continued Monday, September 12: Monterey Plaza Hotel & Spa Dr. Alistair Douglas leads Asia operations for SmartAqua, a marine aquaculture, seafood and environmental advisory group. He developed a fillet-level traceability system that has demonstrated forensic traceability from a single piece of sushi to an individual animal is possible. Timothy Moore is the Senior Partnerships Advisor for the USAID Oceans and Fisheries Partnership (USAID Oceans). He is leading the development of multi-stakeholder partnerships to combat illegal fishing and promote sustainable fisheries management in Asia Pacific through the development and adoption of electronic seafood traceability systems. Eric Enno Tamm is the General Manager for Traceability Initiatives at Ecotrust Canada. In 2010, Ecotrust launched a seafood traceability system ThisFish—a state-of-the-art online social networking and seafood traceability program that maps seafood from boat to plate.

10:45—11:15 a.m.

Break



11:15—12:30 p.m.

Panel 2—Plant Forward



A growing global demand for a meat-based diet places higher stress on the planet’s resources.



Plants can often replace our favorite animal proteins—and the choices for consumers is growing.



How are innovative companies and chefs shifting our preferences to plant-based, planet-friendly,



and healthier alternatives, and how might they influence our food systems more widely?



Moderated by Russ Parsons, Saveur Magazine Dominique Barnes is CEO and Co-founder of New Wave Foods, a company with a mission to change the way we eat seafood. Through technology, they’re creating seafood substitutes crafted entirely in food laboratories. She has a Masters in Marine Biodiversity and Conservation from Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Jonathan Wolfson is co-founder and CEO of TerraVia (formerly Solazyme), a next generation food, nutrition and specialty ingredients company that harnesses the power of algae, the mother of all plants and earth’s original superfood. Its ingredients are incorporated in established products, as well as leading edge plant-based companies. Kasja Alger is the Executive Chef at Mud Hen Tavern. She also teaches vegan/vegetarian cooking classes and is currently working on a project developing plant-based recipes for the low income consumer. She’s always stressed the importance of taking meats away from the center of the plate.



12:30—1:45 p.m.

Lunch

1:45—2:45 p.m. The Global Food Initiative: A conversation with Janet Napolitano The University of California Global Food Initiative addresses one of the critical issues of our time: how to sustainably and nutritiously feed a world population expected to reach eight billion by 2025. The initiative aligns the university’s research, outreach and operations in a sustained effort to develop, demonstrate and export solutions—throughout California, the United States and the world—for food security, health and sustainability. Moderated by Juliet Eilperin, Washington Post





Institute Day 1, continued Monday, September 12: Monterey Plaza Hotel & Spa





Janet Napolitano was named president of the University of California in 2013. In 2014—together with UC’s 10 chancellors—she launched the UC Global Food Initiative. Janet is a distinguished



public servant with a record of leading large, complex organizations at the federal and state



levels, serving as Secretary of Homeland Security from 2009-2012, and as Governor of



Arizona, 2003-2009.



Eating Indigenous: A conversation with Chef Alex Atala and “Sioux Chef” Sean Sherman

2:45—3:30 p.m.



How can eating locally grown, indigenous plants help support local communities and preserve



endemic cultures, all while bringing delicious food to the table? Moderated by Jane Black, Eat. Drink. Think. Chef Alex Atala’s restaurant D.O.M in São Paulo, Brazil has earned recognition as one of the Top 5 restaurants in the world through its unique style of cuisine using indigenous Brazilian ingredients, combined with a commitment to finding sustainable solutions for sourcing them.





Chef Sean Sherman, a Pine Ridge Oglala Lakota Sioux, has been cooking for 27 years. Over the



last few years, his main culinary focus has been on revitalizing indigenous foods systems in a



modern culinary context.



3:30—4:00 p.m.

Break



4:00—4:45 p.m.

Racing Extinction & the Vegan Diet: A conversation with Louie Psihoyos In the Anthropocene, human beings are dramatically changing natural systems on the planet — often with devastating consequences. Food production has profound impacts, both on land and in the ocean. Could a shift to a plant-based diet reduce these impacts, preserve ecosystems and improve human health? Moderated by Carolyn Jung, Food Gal Louie Psihoyos is a renowned photographer, documentary filmmaker, and the executive director of the Oceanic Preservation Society. He has circled the globe dozens of times for National Geographic and has shot hundreds of covers for other magazines. Psihoyos’s first documentary film, The Cove, has won over 70 awards globally from festivals and critics, including an Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature in 2009. He also directed the award-winning documentary, Racing Extinction, about the ways that the global wildlife trade and climate change are driving an extinction crisis. He is completing work on a new film about elite vegan athletes.



4:45—6:30 p.m.

Free time for one-on-one interviews



6:30—9:00 p.m. Reception at Monterey Bay Aquarium

Institute Day 2 – Full Agenda Tuesday, September 13: Monterey Plaza Hotel & Spa

7:30—8:30 a.m.

Breakfast



8:30—9:00 a.m

Keynote 2—Dr. Steve Gaines: The CO2 Footprint of Protein Sources



Population growth of 2.5 billion is predicted over the next 35 years, while wealth is forecast to



increase in developing nations. It’s estimated by 2050, global demand for animal protein may



increase by 80 percent; as people become middle class they dramatically increase their animal



protein consumption. How will that food be produced, and what will be the impacts of producing it?



Dr. Steve Gaines is Dean of the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management at UCSB





and Professor of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology. His research focuses on marine ecology



and conservation, sustainable fisheries, the design of marine reserves, and the impact of climate



change on ocean ecosystems.



9:00—10:00 a.m. Panel 3—Feeding the World with Aquaculture: Luxury vs. Subsistence Global demand for seafood is increasingly met with production from aquaculture, which now supplies over 50% of seafood in the market. However, a large percentage of this growth is in luxury items such as shrimp and salmon. Seafood is an essential source of protein in the developing world, where overfishing, pollution and habitat destruction—often to feed export demand and not the local food supply—has diminished the ability of subsistence fishers to make a living and feed their families. How might aquaculture bridge this gap? Moderated by Paul Greenberg, author of Four Fish and American Catch Dr. Eddie Allison is Professor of Marine and Environmental Affairs at the University of Washington. He centers his research on the human connection to natural resources including the contribution of fisheries and aquaculture to food and nutrition security and coastal livelihoods. Dr. Kevin Fitzsimmons is a past President of the World Aquaculture Society and a Professor at the University of Arizona. His research and extension work since 1981 have focused on improving the sustainability of the aquaculture industry domestically and abroad. Corey Peet is a founding member of the Asian Seafood Improvement Collaborative, a burgeoning Southeast Asian group that seeks to support seafood producers to improve from the ground up by helping them build their own solution to key problems. He has worked on sustainable seafood issues for more than 10 years.

10:00—10:30 a.m.

Break

Institute Day 2, continued Tuesday, September 13: Monterey Plaza Hotel & Spa

10:30—11:15 a.m.

What if California’s Drought Continues? A conversation with Dr. Ellen Hanak California has a highly variable climate and multi-year droughts are common, occurring every 15 to 40 years. The current drought period includes three of the driest years in history, with two records set for winter high temperatures. What are the impacts in the West if the drought continues, and how will we need to improve our drought response if it does? Moderated by Geoffrey Mohan, Los Angeles Times





Ellen Hanak is senior fellow at the Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC) and director of its



Water Policy Center. Under her leadership, the center has become a critical source of information



and guidance for natural resource management in California.



Panel 4—Marine Plastics: What’s the Catch?

11:15—12:15 p.m.







The U.S. alone is responsible for an estimated 8 trillion pieces of plastic debris entering our



watersheds each year. How is all this plastic affecting aquatic food webs and what are the



consequences for healthy marine life populations? Are there downstream implications for the



human predators at the top of the food chain? What are the options towards reducing or



eliminating marine plastic pollution?



Moderated by Marc Gunther, Guardian Sustainable Business Dr. Chelsea Rochman is Assistant Professor at the University of Toronto and UC Davis. She’s an ecologist focusing on marine ecology, environmental chemistry and ecotoxicology. Her research examines the ecological effects of plastic debris on wildlife, water and seafood. Dr. Rolf Halden is Professor of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment at Arizona State University. He has worked on characterizing human exposures to environmental toxicants and on devising strategies for reducing environmental pollution and associated adverse health effects. Dr. Letise LaFeir is California Ocean Policy Manager at the Monterey Bay Aquarium and works to advance the aquarium’s California ocean health initiatives—eliminating marine plastics, support for California’s marine protected area network, and cultivation of other ocean and coastal priorities.



12:15—1:30 p.m.

Lunch

1:30—2:00 p.m. Keynote 3—Dr. Christine Blackburn: Understanding Global Climate Change

Acting Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Conservation and Management How does NOAA collect and analyze data to understand the present and future of our planet? What are we able to forecast about the impacts of global climate change on temperature and rainfall, and what this could signal for the future of our planet, including impacts to fisheries and agricultural crops? How can we better use science and technology to help us monitor, plan and mitigate against future change.

Institute Day 2, continued Tuesday, September 13: Monterey Plaza Hotel & Spa

Dr. Christine Blackburn is with the Climate Program Office at NOAA, which works to advance



understanding of Earth’s climate system, and to foster the application of this knowledge in risk



management and adaptation efforts.



Panel 5—Climate Change: Impacts on Food Security



2:00—3:15 p.m.



The impact of climate change on global food systems is already well-documented and predicted



to intensify. What are the risks to our food systems, and what might this mean for human health?



Will we find sustainable solutions based in technology, genetics, adaptation, mitigation or all of



the above? Moderated by Allison Aubrey, NPR Dr. David Still is Professor in the Department of Plant Sciences at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. His research focuses on plant improvement through breeding, physiological genetics and genomics, and particularly the challenges of growing lettuce in a warming climate, using less water and nitrogen. Dr. David Lobell is an Associate Professor at Stanford University in the Department of Earth System Science and Deputy Director of Stanford’s Center on Food Security and the Environment. His current research focuses on food security, crop yields and climate change, including understanding the risks to regional and global food production. Dr. Nancy McCarthy is President and Founder of LEAD Analytics (Law, Economics & Agriculture for Development) bringing together legal and economic expertise to effectively address growth and development objectives in developing countries, with a particular emphasis on agricultural development, natural resource management, and responses to climate change. Dr. Stephanie Moore is a project scientist with the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research and a visiting scientist with NOAA’s Northwest Fisheries Science Center. She conducts research to develop ecological forecasts for outbreaks of harmful algal blooms and pathogens that threaten seafood safety, public health and the economic value of fisheries.



3:15—3:45 p.m.

Break

Institute Day 2, continued Tuesday, September 13: Monterey Plaza Hotel & Spa

3:45—4:30 p.m.



Trends in Food: A conversation with June Jo Lee The study of food and eating has a long history in anthropology and ethnography, including



research into food and social change, food insecurity, and eating and identity. June Jo Lee is a



food ethnographer, whose research examines the interplay between food culture and health and



identity, taste and desire. What trends can be predicted with regards to more sustainable and/or



healthy food choices?



Moderated by Jennifer Cook, Writer/Editor



June Jo Lee is VP of Strategic Insights at The Hartman Group, a consumer research consultancy. June is committed to connecting individuals, communities and businesses through food as a shared resource.

4:30—5:30 p.m.

Reception with refreshments

Staff Experts Margaret Spring Vice President of Conservation & Science and Chief Conservation Officer [email protected] Margaret directs the aquarium’s conservation and science efforts. She brings to the task senior leadership experience with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and as counsel to the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, where she advised Congress on ocean issues and legislation. She serves on the Ocean Studies Board of the National Research Council.

Aimee David Director of Conservation Policy Strategies [email protected] Aimee directs of the aquarium’s ocean conservation policy strategies, developing and advancing policies to improve ocean health and protect marine wildlife in California, at the national level, and throughout the Pacific Ocean. She has helped lead Aquarium initiatives to ban the trade of shark fin products in California, reduce ocean plastic pollution, and raise awareness of the impacts of climate change on oceans and coasts.

Jennifer Dianto Kemmerly Director of Global Fisheries and Aquaculture [email protected] Jenn leads the aquarium’s respected Seafood Watch program, which engages and empowers North American consumers and businesses to support ocean-friendly fisheries and aquaculture through their purchasing decisions. She also oversees all aquarium activities in support of sustainable fisheries and aquaculture on a global scale, working with businesses, governments and a range of stakeholders to drive improvements in environmental performance and management.

Kyle Van Houtan Director of Science [email protected] Kyle oversees the aquarium’s research department, including programs devoted to bluefin tuna, white sharks and sea otters. He concurrently holds an adjunct professorship at the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke University. His research explores global change, biodiversity conservation, processes arising from climate, long-term ecological monitoring, and ethics.

Josh Madeira Federal Ocean Conservation Policy Manager [email protected] Josh manages a portfolio of policy issues, including the aquarium’s federal fisheries policy and tuna and shark conservation work. He brings experience from The Pew Charitable Trusts, where he oversaw strategic planning and government outreach for domestic oceans campaigns; and the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Natural Resources, where he was a fellow.

Staff Experts, continued Letise LaFeir California Ocean Policy Manager [email protected] Letise works to advance the aquarium’s California ocean health goals, including outreach to senior legislative and government officials, support for marine protected areas and other ocean and coastal priorities. She brings experience from Washington, D.C., where she worked in the office of Congressman Sam Farr (D-California), the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation and NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries.

Wendy Norden Seafood Watch Science Director [email protected] Wendy directs the development of Seafood Watch’s science-based seafood recommendations and maintains Seafood Watch standards for sustainable fisheries and aquaculture. This includes environmental assessments of the operations supplying the North American seafood market, coordination with eco-certification programs, and fishery and aquaculture improvement projects worldwide.

Ryan Bigelow Seafood Watch Program Engagement Manager [email protected] Ryan oversees all public-facing aspects of the Seafood Watch program, including the consumer guides, website, a network of more than 180 Conservation Partner organizations. Ryan works to improve the quality, transparency and accessibility of Seafood Watch’s suite of outreach tools, and manages consumer outreach across nonprofit organizations as a member of the Conservation Alliance for Seafood Solutions.

Shawn Cronin Seafood Watch Business Program Manager [email protected] Shawn supervises the Seafood Watch business team and directs how it strategically engages with businesses, from independent restaurants to corporate partners, including major retailers and food service companies.

For general inquiries, please email [email protected]